Mirtazapine

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Mirtazapine is a second-generation antidepressant agent. Mirtazapine is also classified as a tricyclic antidepressant by the National Library of Medicine in the United States.[1]

History

Remeron brand of mirtazapine was approved for Organon USA by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States with a New Drug Application (NDA) in 1996.[2] A generic version with a AB Therapeutic Equivalence Code was approved for Glenmark Generics with a Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) in 2004.[3]

Effectiveness

"The clinical response of our patients underscores the usefulness of mirtazapine in the treatment of the comorbid symptoms of weight loss, insomnia, and anxiety". [4]

Pharmacology

Mirtazapine is a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA).[5]

Administration

Distribution

Metabolism

Excretion

Toxicity

Drug toxicity is similar to tricyclic antidepressants. Amitriptyline, mirtazapine, and paroxetine may case more weight gain than other antidepressants according to a meta-analysis.[6]

Compared to other antidepressants, a second meta-analysis found that mirtazapine was "more likely to cause weight gain or increased appetite and somnolence than SSRIs but less likely to cause nausea or vomiting and sexual dysfunction."[5]

Mirtazapine can cause elevated liver function tests and neutropenia[7]

External links

The most up-to-date information about Mirtazapine and other drugs can be found at the following sites.


References

  1. Anonymous (2023), Mirtazapine (English). Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. Anonymous. Drugs@FDA for FDA Application No. 020415. U S Food and Drug Administration
  3. Anonymous. Drugs@FDA for FDA Application No. 076119. U S Food and Drug Administration
  4. Raji MA, Brady SR (2001). "Mirtazapine for treatment of depression and comorbidities in Alzheimer disease.". Ann Pharmacother 35 (9): 1024-7. PMID 11573849[e]
  5. 5.0 5.1 Watanabe N, Omori IM, Nakagawa A, Cipriani A, Barbui C, Churchill R et al. (2011). "Mirtazapine versus other antidepressive agents for depression.". Cochrane Database Syst Rev 12: CD006528. DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD006528.pub2. PMID 22161405. Research Blogging.
  6. Serretti A, Mandelli L (2010). "Antidepressants and body weight: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis.". J Clin Psychiatry 71 (10): 1259-72. DOI:10.4088/JCP.09r05346blu. PMID 21062615. Research Blogging.
  7. Montgomery SA (1995). "Safety of mirtazapine: a review.". Int Clin Psychopharmacol 10 Suppl 4: 37-45. PMID 8930008[e]